Today’s NaPoWriMo prompt is an old form I’ve loved since I did summer graduate work w/ several elementary teachers, who taught it to me. I don’t remember what it was called, but certainly not an ‘elevenie.’ It’s a variation on a diamante, as well as a cinquain. But it’s neither, of course.

My life right now is filled w/ the birth of my 2nd grandson, so (predictably!) that’s the topic. An interesting exercise. Here’w the prompt:

Our prompt for Day Twenty-Three comes to us from Gloria Gonsalves, who challenges us to write a double elevenie. What’s that? Well, an elevenie is an eleven-word poem of five lines, with each line performing a specific task in the poem. The first line is one word, a noun. The second line is two words that explain what the noun in the first line does, the third line explains where the noun is in three words, the fourth line provides further explanation in four words, and the fifth line concludes with one word that sums up the feeling or result of the first line’s noun being what it is and where it is. There are some good examples in the link above.

A double elevenie would have two stanzas of five lines each, and twenty-two words in all. It might be fun to try to write your double elevenie based on two nouns that are opposites, like sun and moon, or mountain and sea.

Here it is, a poem for my new grandson ~

For Milo ~

Newborn
Opens hearts
Held in arms
That tremble with happiness
Bliss
Grandson
Second time
Still unexpected magic
Wings on slow aging
Future